Fruit juices and smoothies have ‘unacceptably high’ sugar content

The next time you offer your children a healthy smoothie instead of a soda, you may want to remember that it could contain as much as 13 g/100 ml, equivalent to around 2.5 tsps in a 3.5-oz serving, or approximately two thirds to a half of a child’s recommended daily sugar intake.

High sugar smoothies

Some smoothies have exceptionally high sugar content that are bad for your teeth.

New research, published in the online journal BMJ Open, describes the sugar content of fruit drinks, natural juices and smoothies, in particular, as “unacceptably high.”

According to Yale Health, the average American consumes around 22 tsps of added sugar every day; for teens, the figure is closer to 34. One 12-oz can of soda contains 10 tsps of sugar.

The American Heart Association (AHA) recommend no more than 3-4 tsps of sugar a day for children, and 5 tsps for teens.

In the UK, guidelines recommend a maximum of 19 g, or just under 4 tsps for children aged 4-6 years, and 24 g at age 7-10 years, or just under 5 tsps, according to the UK’s National Health Service (NHS).

As awareness spreads about the impact of sweetened drinks on weight gain and tooth decay, many people are turning to fruit juices and smoothies as healthy alternatives to sodas, iced tea and other favorites.

Even 100% juice is not guilt-free

However, even 100% fruit juice is not as innocent as it seems. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommend not giving juice to infants under 6 months, and children aged 1-6 should have no more than 4-6 oz, or one half to three quarters of a cup. The recommended amount for 7-18 year-olds is 8-12 oz, or 1-2 cups.

Researchers from the University of Liverpool and the University of London in the UK assessed the sugar content per 100 ml (approximately 3.5 oz) of fruit juice drinks, 100% natural juices, and smoothies aimed at children, using information from the pack label.

They checked the amount of “free” sugars in 203 standard portion sizes (200 ml, or around 7 oz) of UK-branded and store-brand products.

Free sugars include glucose, fructose, sucrose and table sugar, which are added by the producer, as well as naturally occurring sugars in honey, syrups, fruit juices and fruit juice concentrates. Although fructose occurs naturally in fruit, when consumed as a drink, it can cause dental caries – as can any other sugar.

There are other naturally occurring sugars in whole fruits and vegetables, which the body metabolizes differently, and they act to curb energy intake. These were not included.

Over 40% of drinks contain 4 tsps of sugar

The sugar content in the drinks surveyed ranged from 0-16 g/100 ml, and the average was 7 g/100 ml, or around 1.5 tsps. It was significantly higher in pure fruit juices and smoothies.

The average sugar content of the 21 pure fruit juices assessed in the survey was as high as 10.7 g/100 ml or just over 2 tsps, and in the 24 smoothies, it was up to 13 g/100 ml, or just over 2.5 tsps. Over 40% of all the products, contained 19 g, or around 4 tsps, of free sugars, the maximum daily amount recommended for children.

Around 78 products contained zero-calorie sweeteners, such as aspartame. While classed as safe, health experts say they are not helping children’s taste buds to get used to a less sweet diet.

Based on the findings, the team recommends:

  • Not counting fruit juices, juice drinks and smoothies with a high free sugar content as one of the “5 a day”
  • Consuming fruit whole, not as juice
  • Diluting fruit juice with water or opting for unsweetened juices, and allowing these only during meals
  • Limiting intake to 150 ml/day, or just over 5 oz
  • Requiring manufacturers to stop adding unnecessary sugars to fruit drinks, juices and smoothies, if necessary, through government intervention.

Medical News Today asked Dr. Simon Capewell, who led the research, whether, in the light of these findings, we should reduce our fruit intake, too.

He told us:

“No. Fruit is very good for the health. Vegetables likewise. Indeed, we would recommend unlimited fruit and vegetables.”

Whole fruit has a higher fiber content than juice, it takes longer to consume, it is more satisfying, and there is evidence that the body metabolizes whole fruit in a different way, adjusting its energy intake more appropriately than it does after drinking juice.

A limitation of the study was that researchers only looked at products that are available in supermarkets, and there may be alternatives with a lower sugar content.

MNT recently reported on research suggesting that health warnings on sugary drinks could encourage parents to think twice about getting them for their children.

In summary, “ALL SMOOTHIES ARE NOT CREATED EQUAL”. As a concerned parents, wanting your children to have healthy bodies and teeth, the key here is quite simple. Smoothies can be incredibly healthy and delicious, but carefully choosing the ingredients without added sugar such as fruit juices, and sticking to fresh all natural fruit can have a profound effect in healthy teeth development.
Dr. Krape Cosmetic and Specialized Dentistry wants to see all their young patients have a bright smile for years to come.
Schedule your family’s routine dental cleaning and check-ups can save you much expense and grief in the long run.
Call today: 561-257-2580

Do You Have These 5 Bad Dental Habits? Cosmetic Dentist – Jupiter

Sometimes you just do not realize what can affect your teeth. You believe you practice good dental care: You brush your teeth, floss fairly regularly, and see your dentist twice a year for checkups and cleanings. Good for you! But you’re probably also engaging in one or more bad habits that can undermine the good ones and compromise your dental health. Here’s our list of five of the worst dental habits, why they’re harmful, and what you can do to stop them.

cosmetic dentist jupiter florida

Girl with beautiful white teeth on reception at the doctor dentist.

DENTAL CARE PROBLEM 1: CRUNCHING, SUCKING, AND SIPPING
You slurp down an ice-cold soda or iced tea and then crunch, crunch, crunch the leftover ice. What’s the harm? The brittleness and cold temperature of ice cubes can actually cause teeth to fracture. They can cause microscopic cracks in the surface of the enamel, which could lead to bigger dental problems over time. Crushed ice is less harmful than bigger cubes, but it still doesn’t get the blessing of most dentists.

Right up there with ice cubes are popcorn kernels, which can also put undue stress on a tooth and cause it to fracture. Some people keep the pits of fruit such as peaches, apricots, and plums in their mouth to suck on and then crunch on.
Sipping sugary soda throughout the day is another bad habit, research suggests. The constant exposure to sweet and acidic beverages can foster tooth decay.

Be mindful of these practices when you eat or drink. Switch to crushed ice in drinks and when eating snacks eat something that’s healthier to chew, such as baby carrots. Sip soda through a straw to minimize soda exposure to your teeth. Be sure the straw is positioned toward the back of the mouth, not resting against your teeth.

DENTAL CARE PROBLEM 2: USING TEETH AS TOOLS

Dentists report that patients rely on their teeth for a number of odd jobs: to tear open a bag of potato chips, uncap a bottle of nail polish, pull out a watch stem, straighten a bent fork tine, or rip a price tag off a piece of clothing. This can be hard on your teeth, traumatizing them or causing the edge of a weakened tooth to chip off or even fracture.

Think about what you’re putting in your mouth before you use your teeth as tools. And keep simple real tools such as a scissors and pliers handy to do the dirty work and let you maintain good dental health.

Dental Care Problem 3: Grinding Your Teeth

Whether you grind your teeth during the day, at night, or both day and night, it wears them down. Although teeth grinding can be caused by stress and anxiety, it is more likely caused by an abnormal bite or missing or crooked teeth.

Your dentist may suggest wearing a mouth guard for teeth grinding at night. Custom models made by your dentist cost more than over-the-counter ones, but they generally fit better and work better, too. Sometimes, it helps simply to be aware that you are grinding your teeth. If it is caused by stress, consider an exercise program or counseling.

You may also want to try cutting back on foods and drinks that contain caffeine; reduce or avoid alcohol consumption; don’t chew on pencils or anything else that isn’t food; if you notice that you clench or grind your teeth during the day, position the tip of your tongue between your teeth to train your jaw muscles to relax; and, relax your jaw muscles at night by holding a warm washcloth against your cheek, in front of the earlobe.

Dental Care Problem 4: Using a Hard-Bristled Toothbrush

Some people think the firmer the toothbrush, the better. This isn’t so, especially for older adults. With age, the gums push back and the roots of the teeth become exposed, often increasing sensitivity. The root is covered with cementum, which is worn away more easily than enamel. A brush with too-firm bristles may irritate the gums and lead to sensitive teeth.

Ask your dentist or hygienist what toothbrush might be best to maintain your dental health.

Dental Care Problem 5: Not Brushing, Flossing, or Rinsing Properly

Some people brush, floss, and rinse their teeth regularly, but not often enough. You should aim to brush twice a day, and be sure to replace your manual toothbrush or electric toothbrush head every three or four months.

Flossing teeth should be done daily, too. If you aren’t sure if you floss properly — and dentists say many people aren’t — ask your dentist or your hygienist for a demonstration on your next visit.

Antiseptic rinses help get rid of bacteria that cause gum disease and bad breath. Fluoride rinses help prevent tooth decay. Dentists recommend rinsing once or twice a day.

You may find a powered toothbrush better, especially if you have hand, arm, or shoulder problems that make manual brushing difficult. If you have children, be sure to buy them child-sized brushes so they fit their hands and mouth, and are easier to use.

Dr. Krape Cosmetic and Specialized Dentistry of Jupiter can determine and may suggest additional remedies that can protect your teeth and gums from further damage. Always be sure to schedule routine cleaning and exams that can prevent conditions that may become irreversible.

Serving: Jupiter, Tequesta, Palm Beach Gardens, Juno Beach, North Palm Beach, Florida and surrounding areas.

Published by: http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/do-you-have-these-5-bad-dental-habits

Dentists, Palm Beach Gardens – Who to choose?

It’s no secret with the demise of the Yellow Pages, many dentists have come to rely heavily on the power of the internet and the 100’s of tools and subscriptions offered to place their practice at the top of the list. Anywhere from paid advertising, cooperative banner placement and of course social media options, the race is on. However, the one area that stands heads above the rest is years of happy patients and their 5 star testimonial reviews and referrals.

Experience, consistency and quality dental treatments year after year have truly been the key to Dr. Krape Cosmetic and Gentle Family Dentistry success.

Just drive thru Palm Beach Gardens, Jupiter and North Palm Beach and notice how many cosmetic dentist offices there are however, most have not stood the test of time that Dr. Krapes office of general dentists and specialists have enjoyed for over 40 years.

Dr. Krape - Cosmetic Dentist Palm Beach Gardens

Dr. Krape Cosmetic Dentistry

“You must have a sincere interest and concern for your patients welfare” says, Dr. Krape.

Quality dental care and treatment has come under much scrutiny when it comes to health insurance and what they will and will not pay for. Dr. Krape has always put preventative treatment and care above all else and whenever possible will offer options that can keep a tooth living for as long as possible before root canal, crown, dental implant or other prosthetic options are considered.

At Dr. Krape Cosmetic and Gentle Family Dentistry this modus operandi is not negotiable and is a mandatory practice by all the dentists at Dr. Krapes’ office.

So when it comes to choosing the best dentist in Palm Beach Gardens, Jupiter and North Palm Beach communities, make sure these fundamental concerns are a top priority.

For a free consultation, please call us at: 561-257-2580

Could a probiotic pill prevent dental cavities?

In 2011-2012, dental cavities, or caries, affected 91% of adults aged 20-64 years in the US, exacerbated by consumption of sugary foods and drink, lack of oral hygiene and not paying regular visits to the dentist.

For the mouth to stay healthy, pH levels must be neutral. Too much acid can cause dental cavities or other disorders.

Acid in the mouth causes bacteria on the teeth to create more acid, and acid dissolves the teeth.

FInd the Best Dentist in Jupiter, Florida

Incorporating A12 into probiotic treatment could reduce the risk of cavities.

 

Researchers at the University of Florida (UF) College of Dentistry, led by Robert Burne, PhD, and Marcelle Nascimento, PhD, wanted to know what causes high pH.

Their search revealed a new strain of bacteria that could keep bad bacteria under control, and pave the way to using probiotics to prevent cavities.

Keeping a balanced pH in the mouth

Previous research by the same authors has found that two main compounds are broken down into ammonia, and this helps to neutralize acid in the mouth.

The two compounds are urea, which everyone secretes in the mouth, and arginine, an amino acid. The researchers already knew that people who had few or no cavities were better at breaking down arginine than those with cavities.

Fast facts about cavities

  • In 2011-2012, 17.5% of 5-19-year-olds had dental caries
  • Among those aged 20-44 years, the figure was 27.4%
  • 83% of those aged 2-17 years visited the dentist in the previous year.

Learn more about oral health care

They knew that bacteria were responsible for breaking down these compounds, but did not know which bacteria do this best, or how this activity prevents cavities.

Part of the answer is a previously unidentified strain of Streptococcus, currently called A12.

Samples of dental plaque, the bacteria that grow on the surface of teeth and can contribute to the formation of cavities, were collected for the study.

Over 2,000 bacteria were then screened to find the right one. The team characterized 54 bacteria that metabolized arginine. Of these, A12 had all the properties needed to prevent cavities probiotically.

The researchers then sequenced the entire genome of A12.

They hope to use the findings to develop a screening tool for people with a higher risk of developing cavities, alongside other factors, such as diet and oral hygiene habits.

Nascimento says that if they can confirm that people with a higher level of A12 develop fewer cavities, A12 could be used to measure for cavity risk.

‘Good’ bacteria to fight the bad

Burne explains that, just as we might use a probiotic approach to the gut to promote health, a similar strategy could be effective for the mouth.

He adds:

“You would implant this probiotic in a healthy child or adult who might be at risk for developing cavities. However many times you have to do that, once in a lifetime or once a week, the idea is that you could prevent a decline in oral health by populating the patient with natural beneficial organisms.”

The fact that A12 helps to neutralize acid by metabolizing arginine was not the only discovery. The authors also found that A12 often kills Streptococcus mutans, an especially harmful kind ofl bacteria.

Even when A12 did not kill S. mutans, it hindered it from causing disease by disrupting the processes.

Burne points out that growing A12 and S. mutans together reduced the ability of the bacterium to develop properly or to make biofilms, also known as dental plaque.

S. mutans metabolizes sugar into lactic acid, and this contributes to the acidic conditions that form cavities.

Meanwhile, the researchers hope to carry out a larger study to find more instances of A12, and to test how prevalent bacteria with similar properties are in the human mouth.

While the development of an effective oral probiotic is still a long way off, A12 looks a promising candidate.

Medical News Today reported last month that people who sleep with their mouth open may have a higher risk of tooth decay.
Written by Yvette Brazier
Published: Friday 11 March 2016

Dr. Krape Cosmetic & Gentle Family Dentistry offers informative articles to its patients and community in the Northern Palm Beaches form Jupiter, Palm Beach Gardens and North Palm Beach, Florida in order to bring awareness to new medical science that continues to unveil the direct correlation between a well balanced diet, exercise and your oral health.

Continued research may produce a Probiotic pill which can aid in better oral health however, this is not necessarily the remedy, but an aid. Much has been said about reducing processed (fast) foods, eating more natural whole foods, reducing or even eliminating acid producing sugars in order to obtain better health. Dr. Krape also knows that regular brushing, daily flossing and routine teeth cleaning and exams are a must.

A well trained, experienced dentist can identify overall physical health concerns by the condition of your mouth and teeth and offer sound advice that could save you much grief in the long run.

Schedule your teeth cleaning and exam today! Call: 561-257-2580.

Best Dentist–North Palm Beach, Florida? Ask your neighbors…

Taking a journey down US. Hwy. One from North Palm Beach to Lake Park, Florida has seen tremendous changes especially in the last 50 years. Who better to talk about those changes then Dr. Jerry Krape himself. After serving in the US Army as a captain, started a family with his true love Olivia Krape in El Paso, TX. Dr. Krape, his wife and their newly first born daughter, Michelle relocated to North Palm Beach, Florida in 1969.

Dr. Krape and daughter Michelle, 1967

Dr. Krape and daughter Michelle, 1967

Over the last 47 years, much has changed in North Palm Beach however, the one thing that never changed was Dr. Krapes’ consistent reputation for friendly, gentle and quality family dentistry.

Best Dentist in North Palm BeachA huge supporter of the community of North Palm Beach, Dr. Jerry and his wife raised three more daughters, and are proud of their 11 grandchildren.

Dr. Jerry is also well-known for his love of the ocean and fishing. Owning just about every size boat imaginable, fishing not just locally, but abroad as well.

When it comes to looking after his patients, Dr. Krape maintained years of trusted and loyal service to so many. As the dentist of his patients children, Dr. Jerry had the pleasure to care for extended generations of families.

So when asked by so many in North Palm Beach, Florida who they would consider the best dentist? It’s no surprise you will hear Dr. Jerry Krape, Cosmetic and Gentle Family Dentistry mentioned over and over again.

So, we encourage you to ask your neighbors…

Dr. Krape continues to run  his practice, with a full staff of specialists including a Periodontist, Endodontist, Prosthodontist as well as General Dentistry.

The practice utilizes the latest state of the art technology and equipment and performs such procedures and treatments like Dental Implants, Dentures and Bridges, Root Canals and Crowns, Extractions, Porcelain Veneers, and even entire smile-makeovers.

If you and your family are looking for a dentist, please give Dr. Krape Cosmetic Dentistry a call at: 561-257-2580.

“Your smile means everything to us!”

Bacteria-Causing Gum Disease May Lead to Oral Cancer Growth

Dr. Krape Cosmetic and Gentle Family Dentistry offers blog articles that he considers of high value to his patients. Awareness and prevention are the keys to a long, happy and healthy smile. Gum Disease is one of the most serious conditions that can develop and often is so gradual that most people fail to recognize it. Routine visits for teeth cleaning and proper daily oral hygiene is paramount to your overall bodies health. As science and medicine has learned…many other complications can develop from poor oral health and gum disease. Read more…

Dentist Palm Beach Gardens - Gum Disease Prevention

Gum Disease is no laughing matter!

Fatty acids from bacteria present in gum disease may cause Kaposi’s sarcoma (KS)-related lesions and tumors in the mouth.

The information comes from a study by Case Western Reserve University. The researchers analyzed how byproducts in the form of fatty acids cause the growth of the lesions.

This finding could result in early saliva testing for bacteria. The person could then possibly be treated for signs of cancer or cancer before it would become malignant.

The information appears in the Journal of Virology.

The study primarily looks at the bacteria Porphyromonas gingivalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum, both of which are connected to gum disease. People with periodontal disease show high levels of these bacteria in their saliva.

KS affects many people with HIV because their immune systems can’t battle many infections. KS initially appears as lesions on the mouth that could turn into malignant tumors. Early detection is a key to surviving the disease.

The goal of this study was to pinpoint why most people don’t develop this type of cancer and what it is that spares them from it.

To compile the data 21 patients were studied. The first 11 had an average age of 50 and dealt with severe chronic gum disease. The other group of 10 maintained good oral health and had an average age of 26.

Numerous aspects of the saliva of each participant were studied. The research team was interested in the two bacteria, specifically, in addition to five short-chain fatty acids.

After first testing the byproducts, researchers concluded the fatty acids impacted the replication KS. They then introduced clean versions of the fatty acids into cells with the KS virus to see what the reaction was. Essentially, the body was prevented from trying to stop the growth of KS.

The study magnifies the importance of oral health for people with HIV.

Article authored by: Dentistry Today

Dr. Krape Cosmetic and Gentle Family Dentistry offers blog articles that he considers of high value to his patients. Awareness and prevention are the keys to a happy and healthy smile.

Why Dentists continue to highly encourage flouride treatment.

Calgary Removed Fluoride from Water and Saw an Increase in Tooth Decay

  • Dan Arel – Award-winning journalist and bestselling author
Dentist in Jupiter Florida

Dentists in Jupiter Recommends Fluoride Treatment

When Calgary, Alberta decided to remove fluoride from its drinking water in 2011, the rate of tooth decay in Calgary children increased found a new study. The research, published in the journal Community Dentistry and Oral Epidemiology, compared rates of tooth decay among second-grade students in Calgary and Edmonton, a city 300 km north of Calgary that still adds fluoride to its drinking water.

The decision by cities around North America to remove fluoride from drinking water has been rather controversial. Medical research, to date, has found no harmful effects of adding fluoride to public water supplies and have long argued the benefits of doing so. Yet, opponents of the practice have continued to argue against medical science and claim that fluoride can actually lower a child’s IQ level; a claim that has long since been debunked.

“We designed the study so we could be as sure as possible that [the increased tooth decay] was due to [fluoride] cessation rather than due to other factors,” said Lindsay McLaren, a researcher at the University of Calgary’s Cumming School of Medicine who led the study. “We systematically considered a number of other factors and in the end, everything pointed to fluoridation cessation being the most important factor.”

McLaren said the cause and effect are clear because of the way they designed the study.

In 2011, Calgary’s city council voted 10-3 to remove fluoride after citing insufficient medical evidence that it was necessary or offered any benefit.

“We as a council have to show some leadership here,” Ward 3 Coun. Jim Stevenson said in 2011, after the decision to remove the fluoride. “I would really question our right to put [fluoride] in, but I don’t question at all our right to remove it.”

Dentists, however, did not agree with the decision and continued to argue for fluoridated water as an ideal and cost effective method for fighting tooth decay, especially for those who cannot afford to visit a dentist regularly.

“It’s not unusual for us to see a child with almost full-mouth decay in the population that we’re looking at, and considering that we’re in Calgary, we shouldn’t be seeing that degree of disease here and we are,” said Denise Kokaram, of the Alex Dental Health Bus. She finds the results troubling because she believes that it could have been fully prevented if not for the ill-informed actions of the city council. “And to think of that rising, and those children suffering and in even more pain, when it’s such an easy thing to remedy to remedy or, at least, assist with,” said added.

Alex Dental saw 1,700 children in Calgary last year, and Kokaram said nearly 50 percent of them suffered from tooth decay.

American cities such as Portland, Oregon have also made the decision not to add fluoride to their water supply after citing health risks, most of which are perpetrated by conspiracy theorists, and not backed by medical research. With new data coming out of Canada, one must wonder if cities in the United States and others around Canada will take note and rethink making rash decisions based on bad information. Multiple studies in the past have shown an increase in dental health was needed in lower income populations in the U.S. and coupled with the findings in Calgary, it should be clear that one solution is fluoridating the water supply.

No study as has been released looking at cities such as Portland and compared it to cities that do add fluoride to the water, but it seems the time for such a study is now. The Calgary study looked at 600 children between 2004 and 2005 before the fluoride was removed from the water supply, and then researchers looked at data from nearly 3,500 children in both cities from 2013 and 2014, after the removal. Researchers saw a significant increase in tooth decay in children whose permanent teeth had begun coming in, a finding they did not believe they would find given the short time between the removal of fluoride and the study. Researchers had set out to gather information on children primary teeth and were surprised by the significant rise in permanent, making their finds more alarming in their opinion. The benefits of doing similar studies in other parts of North America would be greatly beneficial.

The Calgary study will certainly help arm supporters of fluoridation and gives solid medical evidence that the addition of fluoride to drinking water is a positive step for public health, especially in low-income communities when visiting dentists is far rarer as it’s an unaffordable task.

Dr. Krape has always encouraged his patients to regularly use Fluoride in the prevention of tooth decay. The science and medical benefits are un-refutable. When it comes to finding a dentist that will keep you smiling BIG! Choose Dr. Krape Cosmetic and Gentle Family Dentistry!

Call: 561-257-2580 Today!

“Only Floss the Teeth You Want to Keep”! says Dr. Krape Cosmetic Dentistry, Jupiter, Florida

One of Doctor Jerry Krapes’ words of wisdom for his patients for over 40 year still rings true today. Flossing your teeth regularly is not always one of the easiest disciplines to remember, but if you can develop this as part of your daily routine it can becomes a perfunctory habit that will save you much grief, pain and expense in the future.

Like any good habit, it must start with a daily time you choose, whether you leave a note on your mirror, or a reminder alert on your phone, once you start, it only becomes easier in time.

Dr. Krape - Cosmetic Dentist

Dr. Krape Cosmetic Dentistry

Below are 7 excuses we use, and ways to overcome them.

Flossing your teeth is more important to your well-being than even brushing. So why do so many of us find reasons not to do it?

We’ve got excuses, but dentists have simple answers for them all.

Excuse No. 1: Food Never Gets Stuck In My Teeth

The main purpose of flossing isn’t to remove food from the teeth. It’s to get rid of plaque. Busting out the floss every day prevents gum disease and tooth loss. Everybody gets plaque, and it can only be removed by flossing or a deep cleaning from your dentist.

Excuse No. 2: I Don’t Know How to Floss

It’s “the most difficult personal grooming activity there is,” says Samuel B. Low, DDS, past president of the American Association of Periodontology. But it’s one of the most important to learn.

Use these tips to floss correctly:

  • Use 18 inches of floss. Wrap most of it around the middle finger of one hand, the rest around your other middle finger.
  • Grasp the string tightly between your thumb and forefinger, and use a rubbing motion to guide it between teeth.
  • When the floss reaches the gum line, form a C to follow the shape of the tooth.
  • Hold the strand firmly against the tooth, and move it gently up and down.
  • Repeat with the other tooth, and then repeat the entire process with the rest of your teeth.
  • Use fresh sections of floss as you go.

Don’t forget the back of your last molars. “By far, most gum disease and most decay occurs in the back teeth,” Low says.

Excuse No. 3: I’m Not Coordinated Enough to Floss

If you have trouble reaching the back of your mouth, ask your dentist about:

  • Plastic, disposable, Y-shaped flossers that allow for extra reach
  • Small, round brushes
  • Pointed, rubber tips
  • Wooden or plastic pics (called interdental cleaners)

A child will need your help to floss until he’s about 11 years old. Kids should start to floss as soon as they have two teeth that touch.

Excuse No. 4: I Don’t Have Time

Find a time of day that works for you. You should floss at least once a day. Two times is best.

Make it a part of your routine, morning and night. If you find you forget, store your floss with your toothbrush and toothpaste to remind yourself.

You don’t have to do it in front of your bathroom mirror. Keep some floss in your car to use while you’re in traffic. Stash some in your desk and use it after lunch. The key is to fit in flossing when it works for you.

Excuse No. 5: It Hurts

If your gums bleed or hurt, you may have gingivitis or gum disease. That’s an even bigger reason to floss.

“Flossing should not be a painful experience, but stopping flossing because of bleeding [or pain] is just the opposite of what you should be doing,” says Mark S. Wolff, DDS, PhD, chairman of cariology and comprehensive care at the NYU College of Dentistry.

If you brush and floss daily, the bleeding and pain should stop in less than 2 weeks. If it doesn’t, see your dentist.

Excuse No. 6: I’m Pregnant

It may be hard to floss if you’re tired or nauseated. But it’s important to keep up with your brushing and flossing routine. Pregnancy can cause a wide range of dental issues, from gum disease to enamel wear.

Excuse No. 7: My Teeth Are Too Close Together

Try waxed or glide floss for an easier fit. If you have recessed gums, varied gaps between teeth, or braces, you can also try a threader or loop to find an easier entry point. If your floss shreds, you may have a cavity or a problem with dental work, like a broken crown or loose filling. Ask your dentist to take a look.

 

Not just a toothache: periodontal disease linked to breast cancer

Postmenopausal women with periodontal disease are more likely to develop breast cancer, according to research published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention. Those with a history of smoking are particularly affected.
Dr Krape Dentist - Jupiter, Florida

Women with periodontal disease have a higher risk of breast cancer.

Periodontal disease is a common condition that ranges from simple gum inflammation to a serious disease causing major damage to the soft tissue and bone that support the teeth, and loss of teeth.

It has also been associated with heart disease, stroke, and diabetes, as well as oral, esophageal, head and neck, pancreatic and lung cancers. Previous studies have suggested that chronic inflammation could provide the link.

Risk factors for periodontal disease include genetic predisposition, smoking and hormonal changes in girls and women, which can make gums more sensitive so that it is easier for gingivitis to develop.

People with reduced ability to fight infection due to diseases such as diabetes or treatment for cancer are also prone. Medications that limit the flow of saliva can also leave the mouth vulnerable to infections.

Regular brushing, flossing and cleaning by the dentist can help to prevent it.

Researchers led by Jo L. Freudenheim, PhD, distinguished professor in the Department of Epidemiology and Environmental Health in the University at Buffalo’s School of Public Health and Health Professions, NY, set out to investigate if there was any relationship with breast cancer.

The team monitored 73,737 postmenopausal women who were enrolled in the Women’s Health Initiative Observational Study. None of the women had previous breast cancer, but 26.1% of them had periodontal disease.

Periodontal disease raises risk of breast cancer by 14%

Previous studies have suggested that smoking impacts the development of periodontal disease, so the researchers took smoking status into account.

After a mean follow-up time of 6.7 years, 2,124 women were diagnosed with breast cancer. The researchers found that among all women, the risk of breast cancer was 14% higher in those who had periodontal disease.

Among women who had quit smoking within the past 20 years, those with periodontal disease had a 36% higher risk of breast cancer.

Women who were smoking at the time of the study had a 32% higher risk of breast cancer if they had periodontal disease, but the association was not statistically significant.

Those who had never smoked had a 6% increased risk, and those who had quit more than 20 years ago had an 8% increased risk if they had periodontal disease.

Freudenheim explains:

“We know that the bacteria in the mouths of current and former smokers who quit recently are different from those in the mouths of non-smokers.”


One possible explanation for the link between periodontal disease and breast cancer is that bacteria enter the body’s circulation and ultimately affect breast tissue.

However, further studies are needed to establish a causal link.

Limitations include the fact that women self-reported their periodontal disease status, after being asked whether a dentist had ever told them they had it.

Also, since the study focused on women who were already enrolled in a long-term national health study, they were more likely than the general population to be receiving regular medical and dental care, making them more likely to be health-conscious than the general population.

Earlier this year, Medical News Today reported that blueberry extract could be used as a treatment for periodontal disease.
Written by Yvette Brazier
Published: Monday 21 December 2015

 

Dr. Krape, Cosmetic and Gentle Family Dentistry highly recommends this read for all women, but especially those considered high risk. It has been no secret that good dental hygiene and especially the prevention of periodontal disease is so paramount to good overall body health. However, the risk of some of the most dangerous and aggressive cancers to especially women and the rising statistics of breast cancer should not be taken lightly.

So, the best thing you can do besides living as healthy a lifestyle as possible is to always brush, floss daily and do not neglect your routine teeth cleaning appointments. It’s a plain fact that can save you the additional expenses of more extensive and serious treatments later. But, most importantly, it can actually save your life!

Dr. Krape – You and your smile means everything to us!

Canker Sores? Causes, Remedies and Prevention – Palm Beach Gardens Dentist -Educational Article

Dr. Krape Dentistry found this article written by Markus MacGill at MNT of particular value to our patients. We often receive calls or questions regarding Canker Sores. The following is a fairly in-depth article that addresses many of your questions and concerns.

Canker sores go by a number of other names as well as the main medical one of aphthous ulcers or recurrent aphthous ulcers.

These terms include aphthous stomatitis or recurrent aphthous stomatitis, aphthae and mouth ulcers.

Aphthous ulcers are easily identified in the mouth and well known, but is there anything that can be done about them? Are there times when canker sores require medical attention? This article answers these and other questions with easy-to-understand information about canker sores.

In the UK, the term “mouth ulcer” is used instead of “canker sore.” When British people are talking about common mouth ulcers, they are typically referring to canker sores and not other forms of mouth ulcer such as herpetic ulcers.

Contents of this article:

  • What is a canker sore?
  • Treatments and prevention

Fast facts on canker sores…
Here are some key points about aphthous ulcers in the mouth.

  1. Canker sores are a very common type of mouth ulcer known as aphthous ulcers
  2. Canker sores are typically round and less than a centimeter across, with a white or gray-yellow center surrounded by a red margin.
  3. Common canker sores are easy to identify by their appearance under a bright light
  4. The main symptom of canker sores is pain at the site of the ulcer, which is irritated further by certain foods and teeth cleaning
  5. While risk factors are proposed, common aphthous ulcers have no clearly identified causes
  6. Less common types of sore do have associations with other conditions that can often be addressed, such as mouth ulcers caused by herpesvirus
  7. Most aphthous ulcers do not need medical attention and can be home-treated for the symptoms
  8. Canker sores typically heal over naturally, usually within two weeks
  9. More persistent, severe, numerous or particularly recurrent canker sores should be seen by a dentist or doctor.

What is a canker sore?

mouth-ulcer-on-lower-lipCanker sores, also known as aphthous ulcers, are a common oral health complaint.
A canker sore is a type of mouth ulcer known medically as an aphthous ulcer. Aphthous ulcers are one of the most common complaints of the mouth, occurring at any age but being more likely in younger adults and women.

A first episode often occurs during adolescence, although children as young as 2 years may develop canker sores.

Many people have only occasional aphthous ulcers. The proportion of the population affected by recurrent episodes is estimated to range between 20% and 30%.

Causes of canker sores
Research has failed to give a scientific explanation of why canker sores develop, although there are known specific factors such as viral infection.

The causes of recurrent cases of canker sore – known as recurrent oral aphthous ulcers or recurrent aphthous stomatitis – are also unclear, although there are correlations with a number of factors.

A note for readers who use “mouth ulcers” to refer to what are canker sores: people more familiar with the canker term, such as in the US, may be referring to a broader group of lesions when they say mouth ulcers.

Fever blisters (cold sores)
Herpes infection leading to fever blisters can sometimes affect the oral mucosa, the same lining inside the mouth affected by aphthous ulcers.

Mouth ulcers in the broader group that are not canker sores may have a specific cause – fever blisters, for example (due to the herpes virus), or other infections and conditions.

Ulcers are sometimes associated with other conditions needing medical attention, such as inflammatory bowel disease, compromised immunity, allergies and nutritional deficiency.

All cases of aphthous ulcers lack a cure for the canker sores themselves, and treatment of the ulcers is largely confined to managing the symptoms.

While there is no firm understanding of why canker sores occur, a number of factors are thought to have some involvement, including:

  1. Hormonal changes
  2. Physical trauma (damage to the lining of the mouth, such as during dental treatment)
  3. Drugs
  4. Food hypersensitivity
  5. Nutritional deficiencies, including of iron, folic acid or vitamin B12
  6. Stress.

A report by the US Surgeon General cites up to a quarter of the general population being affected by recurrent aphthous ulcers, noting there may be higher numbers among selected groups, such as health professional students.

Symptoms of canker sores
Canker sores have clear features. The lesions cause local pain and can be easily irritated.

There are otherwise no further symptoms in simple cases, although the pain may cause feelings of being fed up with the mouth ulcer.

Common features of canker sores include them being:

  • Usually well-defined, round, smaller than a centimeter across, and usually shallow in the mouth’s lining, its mucosal surface
  • White or yellow-gray center surrounded by an inflammatory red margin.
  • In medical terms, this means an ‘erythematous halo’ is seen around a fibrinous “pseudomembrane” formed over the mucosal ulceration (eruption/destruction)
  • Often fading to gray over time
  • Usually in the front part of the mouth, on its floor, inside of the lip (labial mouth), inside of the cheeks (buccal), or under the front or sides of the tongue
  • Sometimes affecting the gums (relatively uncommon on the surface of the back part of the mouth)
  • Persistent for typically a week or two before healing.

When to see a doctor about canker sores
Common canker sores usually heal without the need for medical treatment. More severe or recurrent cases may be eased by prescribed treatments, although these do not “cure” such ulcers.

Sometimes mouth ulcers are associated with other conditions that require medical attention. Examples are inflammatory bowel disease, compromised immunity, allergies and nutritional deficiency.

As a general guide, canker sores should be brought to the attention of a dentist or doctor when they:

  • Persist for more than 2 weeks without improvement
  • Get worse – including while being treated with home remedies
  • Recur often – 2 to 3 times a year or more – or are particularly numerous or severe
  • Are accompanied by other symptoms, such as fever, diarrhea, headache or skin rash
  • Come with any concern at all that another condition may be related to them.

For quality cosmetic dentistry at its best, please call 561-257-2580 for all your dental needs. Serving Jupiter, Tequesta, Palm Beach Gardens, Juno Beach, North Palm Beach and northern palm beach county.